FREE eCOURSE ON
    BUSINESS BLOGGING

    Everything you need to set-up, develop & promote a successful Business Blog

    Full Name

    Email

    Referred by


    FULL COURSE DETAILS HERE

  • Warren: Blogging and Social Media definitely go hand in hand. Having a successful social presence can do a lot for a...
  • Jennifer Rai: All points mentioned above are very well put together. Blogs having purpose and a focus on certain...
  • jessica@lukeroxas: I ran a small home based business, and lately I’ve decided to put up my own website,...
  • Rob: Rather weird that a blog on blogging hasn’t been updated since 2009!
  • Ayala Land: Perhaps I was one of those companies who, as you put it “think they can avoid it” but thanks to well...

    Join me on Twitter at @BlogCoach




    New Media Marketing: here are all the key posts


    There have been a number of comments over recent weeks (and indeed months) about the imminent death of blogging, to be generally replaced it seems with newer tools such as Twitter and lifestreaming.

    For a small minority, it’s possible that this may well be on the cards – however, for the vast majority, and particularly those using these tools for primarily business purposes, I would say that this prediction is premature in the extreme.

    Indeed, with the growing presence of social media as a marketing and comms tool in its own right, are we going to be seeing a decline in the role of blogging as one part of that? My answer is a resounding no and I’ll explain why.

    Blogs will play a central role

    It is true that there are major changes afoot – the industry is currently developing quickly ahead of an undoubted period of consolidation. As a result, I am constantly looking at the variety of social media which now exist, of which a business blog is certainly one. In the future, while the number of potential avenues for social media continues to expand, I still see a blog playing the central role for companies wanting to engage with customers and prospects using social media and general online methods.

    For instance, if we take some of the more popular social media tools as examples:

    • Microblogging in the current guise of Twitter is great but a little restrictive – it’s difficult to save evrything in 140 characters, so is often used to make people aware of other sources of information or to initiate connections;

    • Social networks are proliferating in many different forms from the monsters such as Facebook to the niche forums on systems like Ning – they come and go (some quicker than others obviously) but each time a new one takes hold you need to establish a whole new infrastructure and set of contacts;

    • Podcasts and video have their own key sites like YouTube or iTunes but in most cases, businesses fail to achieve an independent identity or forum with them alone, although cases such as “Will it Blend?” from Blendtech prove that it is possible.

    A blog, however, allows a business to bring all of these other elements together, creates a focal point for a community of customers, provides the company with its own social network hub whatever else goes on in the market and allows it to expand on the information disseminated on Twitter, YouTube or iTunes.

    Business BLog as your online home

    A personal analogy

    To put it another way, if I make a personal analogy, if I meet friends in a bar or a coffee shop, then they will get a certain picture of me through a number of different factors: what I am wearing, what I look like, where we are meeting, what I’m drinking, who I am talking to and about what etc. All of these things give a certain picture of me as a person but it is still a superficial one.

    However, if you come and have dinner at my home then you have a much more complete view of me. You see where I live, the type of house, the décor, the books and music I’m interested in, the decoration and style of fixtures and furniture, what I cook and what I serve for drinks etc etc. In short, you get a much more complete sense of me when you visit my home because it is much more multifaceted.

    To my mind, social networking sites, discussion forums, Twitter etc are all types of coffee houses where you can a first image of me. My blog, however, offers much more of an insight and is essentially the online equivalent of my home.

    You need a place to invite people to online

    Don’t take this as putting down the other social media tools or indeed other general online marketing tactics – it is just the opposite. All the other elements are great when used in line with a business’ commercial aims, but you still then need to have somewhere to “invite” friends back to online rather than always meet in proverbial bars / coffee houses. That’s where a blog comes to the fore, bringing all the other elements together as well as contributing in its own right.

    Think also that as you engage with other bloggers on their own blogs, there is only so much that you can convey when you leave comments, no matter how erudite and pertinent they are. What you need to have in conjunction is a place to develop your ideas further. A place to continue that conversation that you have started – once again, a role that your own blog would ideally fulfil.

    Effectively, as you look at the world of social media and the innumerable opportunities that it brings with it, to me it is clear that a blog sits solidly at the core of this activity. Personally, I see it as driving and conducting the online activity that a company undertakes and as the place to develop a community of readers that links from other social media will help grow and promote.

    If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!

    16 Comments 
    Tags: , , ,

    Recomended Reading:

    1. Predictions for 2007
    2. Online media guidelines from an unexpected source
    3. History of (Personal) Blogging
    4. Social Media – coming ready or not
    5. Business Blogs, Social Media and Welcome Mats

    Over the past couple of weeks, Ive had a number of enquiries from different social networks, or rather from certain of their members, asking me to join their networks. Granted, many of these are automated – which amounts to spamming by the website owners in my view, but thats another story – but this has nevertheless been a clear demonstration to me of the continuing growth and proliferation of social networks.

    Networks and networking in general are hugely important to businesses of all sizes and small businesses in particular. Therefore joining these social networks or business networks is undeniably useful to a point – although I feel that it is nigh impossible to maintain a useful presence in more than a few before you spread yourself too thinly and get lost in the crowd.

    The problem as I see it though, is that when we talk about social networks, we are usually merely refering to a website or platform. All the new social networks that keep appearing are in fact just different websites whose main focus is to create their own network environments (with associated revenue potential) rather than really help us to create our own personal network.

    This is potentially in conflict with what we are all actually interested in, which is our own network (whether that be social or business), made up of people that we want to communicate, interact and deal with.

    As individuals or as businesses, what we really need to do is create our own network, a network which exactly matches the interests, goals and requirements that we have. In fact, a blog is an excellent way to achieve this and to create not only a network but, where possible, a community focused on a specific area. It allows people who just want to network and connect with you to do so, and it gives you the means and opportunity to develop those relationships.

    At the end of the day, by all means join as many networks as you can realistically participate in but chose them according to the goals that you have for your business and use them for the benefits they bring at the time. However, if you truly want to participate in a network which will endure and will best serve your networking goals, then set up a business blog where you can create and develop your own.

    If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!

    3 Comments 
    Tags: , , , ,

    Recomended Reading:

    1. Blogs as Social and Business Networks
    2. Blogs for Market Research and Focus Groups
    3. Blogs and HR: which HR manager is right?
    4. Business Blogs, Social Media and Welcome Mats
    5. Social Media – coming ready or not

    When creating a successful corporate blog, there are a number of elements which come together to make it what it is. The content itself is key to this, but the words just form the final part of the blog and one which is supported by a number of other layers or building blocks. Together, they help to determine the blog’s focus and its effectiveness.

    The more that I work with companies (large and small) on their business blogs, the more I see how these different layers must work together to give the right results. This is the case whatever the size of the organisation, though the timescales can vary enormously. A large corporate blog may take several months to come to fruition, not because there are additional elements but due to the number of “interested parties” involved. With a small business blog, the decisions are often made instantly and so the timeframe is shorter; however, the business challenges are similar.

    In both business and corporate blogs, the structure and elements involved are made up as shown below.

    Anatomy of a Blog: Layers and Building Blocks

    1. Philosophy Layer
    The foundations of any business blog should include the basic principles of blogging, which hold true for organisations just as they do for individuals writing their own personal blogs. These would include openness, two-way communication, passion, writing with an authentic voice, authority and personality.

    An organisation intending to establish a blog should consider these carefully as well as the business ideals they embrace. If the company culture is one which does not have the flexibility and openness to accept and apply them, then it is unlikely that it will be able to use the blog to its full potential and it may be better served using other online marketing media.

    2. Technical Layer
    The selection of the blogging software to be used forms an important part of the technical layer together with how the blog is integrated with the company website (or set up separately), the internal IT requirements of the company and the hosting structure required.

    The choice of blogging platform can compromise a corporate blogs potential from the outset if it cannot support the elements needed to achieve the blogs goals. To help future proof the investment in time and money, the platform should therefore not only cover the initial requirements but also have the scope to develop over time as the business needs of company and blog develop.

    This might also take into consideration the technical aspects of Search Engine optimization, for example, which should ensure that the blog has the flexibility to allow page level customisation of elements such as title tags, blog tags and metatags.

    3. Business Layer
    Some of the most important decisions during the preparation phase relate to the overall business requirements of the blog and how it will be used by the company. The basis for these decisions will come from the answers to the 3 key questions which need to be answered right at the start of the process, namely what the aims and goals of the blog are, who its intended audience is and what it is designed to achieve.

    The answers to these questions will effectively decide the format and focus of the blog which in turn will dictate who is the best person/people to write it, how often to add posts, how it will be marketed and what impact it will make on various departments throughout the company. All of these elements form part of the business layer.

    Every successful business blog will have a particular business focus which will influence the way that it looks, its focus and the content that it contains. This focus can take many different forms given that the blog could be an internal blog (sometimes called a “dark blog”) serving a company, project or team or an external one used for branding, customer service, product development or any number of customer facing uses. [Some examples of business blog uses.]

    4. Blog Interface & Graphic Layer
    The graphics and branding elements are important parts of this, but they do not make up the whole story. In addition, the layout of the blog needs to be consistent with the business requirements of the blog so that best use is made of the space available to promote the elements which will support its business goals.

    If your business requirements dictate that you are pushing to get subscribers then your RSS and email subscription areas will be very prominent. If there are special offers or specific service areas which are key to achieving the blog’s goals then these should be made highly visible within the layout and design. Some of the other elements relating to the interface and graphic layer can be found in the Business Blog Design Series.

    5. Content Layer
    Last but certainly not least, the content itself. This is the most important single layer because it is the one that the blogs readers are most aware of and it is the content which will attract them back and turn them from “passers by” into avid readers. However, the content only comes into its own because of the interaction and support of the other layers.

    In truth, many companies and businesses tend to concentrate solely on this layer. However, the blog’s content needs to build on what was outlined in the business layer to achieve the right business focus for the company. This content will then be promoted, highlighted and pushed by the elements in the other layers.

    One important, yet often overlooked, part of content element is the specific use of the individual post titles and specific Search Engine oriented elements such as the titles tags, meta tags and general blog tags, all of which should be provided for in the technical layer.

    Summary
    A blog needs all of the different components to be working together to be really successful and, for a corporate blog, doubly so. A blog using a standard template rather than the organisation’s branding will be less effective, as will one built on a platform which makes leaving comments difficult or one that reads like a sales brochure. Equally, a business blog where all the other aspects are in place but which is aimed at the wrong audience will not achieve the success that it perhaps warrants.

    However, with each of these different layers working together, then the results can be excellent. The day-to-day focus can then be firmly on maintaining the quality and focus of the content and promoting it in the right areas to ensure that it can (and will) achieve the business goals it was designed for.

    If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!

    4 Comments 
    Tags: , , , , , , , ,

    Recomended Reading:

    1. Building Blocks for a Successful Business Blog
    2. What makes a successful corporate blog?
    3. 11 ways to sink your corporate blog, Titanic style
    4. Overcoming the Fear of Corporate Blogging
    5. Planning your Business Blog

    I’ll admit that usually I’m not a fan of lists, hence you won’t find many long ones here at Better Business Blogging. However, when they are recommended by people like Brian Clark at CopyBlogger or Darren Rowse at Problogger then who am I to argue?

    Although I have presented this as a single list, there are really three distinct groups of techniques that I would recommend that you consider in here – firstly what I would call “Blog methods”, then the more general online marketing methods and of course offline marketing and PR techniques. We’ll be looking at all of these on an ongoing basis at The Blog Coach.

    In the meantime, here are 52 Great Ways to market your blog:

    1. Submit your site to the main web directories – you�ll find a good list at Directory Maximiser

    2. Make sure that the whole of your blog is indexed on the main Search Engines such as Google, Yahoo and MSN/Live

    3. Get a Google Sitemap on your blog to help to get it fully indexed

    4. Participate in online business networking sites such as Linked In, eCademy and SoFlow

    5. Make it easy for your readers to bookmark your blog on the social bookmarking sites such as Digg, Del.icio.us, Furl etc.

    6. Make sure you submit your blog to the main Blog directories (Good list here and here)

    7. Also submit your blog to the main RSS directories

    8. Ensure that you automatically ping the main blog Search Engines and Directories suach as Technorati and IceRocket to get instantly indexed – good list of pinging addresses

    9. Join a number of relevant online communities or discussion groups for your market area

    10. Maximise the design of your own blog: highlight posts or subjects that will attract and retain readers

    11. Add comments – relevant, useful comments – to other people�s threads or blogs

    12. Use Pay per Click (PPC) advertising like Google Adwords or Yahoo Search Marketing

    13. Advertise on sites such as Gumtree or Craigslist

    14. Make sure that you run an ezine (e-newsletter) alongside your blog and make the two work together

    15. Make sure that you link out to other blogs in your blog posts and, for special recommended blogs, in your BlogRoll

    16. Join MyBlogLog to be able to make contact with other MyBlogLog users and develop relationships

    17. Set up a social network part of your blog with Ning

    18. Write your own e-book (perhaps using content from your blog) and give away free chapters to encourage visitors or subscribers

    19. Start your own meme or viral networking idea (such as 2000 Bloggers)

    20. Attend local networking groups such as BNI, BRE etc – tell them about what you do and reference your blog

    21. Set up and develop a profile on online social networking sites such as MySpace, Bebo etc.

    22. Create a free account on BT Tradespace

    23. Interview people for your own regular podcast – perhaps you could make it like your own online radio show

    24. Contact other relevant ezines and offer to write articles for them

    25. Submit your articles to article directories (Ezine Articles, Article Alley etc.)and link to your blog in the signature

    26. Submit your own ezine to ezine directories such as Ezine Directory or Best Ezines

    27. Include podcasts as part of your blog to distribute interviews, informational pieces etc.

    28. Convert some of your existing articles into podcasts

    29. Create a lense at Squidoo

    30. Distribute and syndicate your articles and podcasts via your RSS feed

    31. Offer free white papers or specialist documents which are branded with your blog and RSS details

    32. Set up teleconferences or teleseminars focusing on your main content areas

    33. Write a review of books on Amazon.com linking back to your blog

    34. Distribute press releases via online news services such as PR Web or Press Box

    35. Add a poll or survey to your blog and post/distribute the results – try SurveyGizmo if you are a WordPress user

    36. Read other blogs and leave your own comments on them

    37. Use trackbacks when you reference other bloggers� posts

    38. Create podcasts of your best posts and syndicate them, as well as submitting them to iTunes and other podcast directories

    39. Sign up to Feedburner and include the Headline Animator in your email signature and the one you use when you post to forums

    40. Make sure you include your blog address on your business cards and company stationery

    41. Customise and improve your RSS Feed using Feedburner – include special offers, sign up opportunities and make sure the feed delivers the full post

    42. Increase RSS feed sign ups by offering a sign up bonus to subscribers – how? Just ask!

    43. Offer readers the chance to sign up via email (Feedburner and Feedblitz offer the service

    44. Put files and follow ups to presentations, conferences and seminars on your blog for attendees to read and download

    45. Offer to become a Guest blogger on other blogs and invite Guest bloggers to write on your own blog

    46. Make sure to submit articles to and participate in Blog Carnivals (more on Blog Carnivals here)

    47. Optimise your blog where possible and particularly the Categories, Title Tags and Meta Tags

    48. Participate regularly in conversations on other blogs

    49. Post answers on LinkedIn Answers and Yahoo Answers

    50. Try LinkBaiting using controversial subjects or opinions � be careful though!

    51. Contact the main bloggers in your market area and introduce yourself or send details of a particular post that might interest them

    and above all,
    52. Write great content that people will want to read, recommend and link to!

    What other methods (or which of these methods) do you find work best for you as you promote your Blog? Please share them with us by leaving a comment!

    If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!

    89 Comments 
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

    Recomended Reading:

    1. 14 ways to help increase your RSS subscribers
    2. Where to find business blogs (and where to get yours found!)
    3. Promoting and Marketing your Business Blog (Intro)
    4. Promoting and Marketing your Business Blog (Blog specifc methods)
    5. Books, media and blogs (using blogs to promote books)

    BBC and YouTubeIn any interesting move today, and I believe the first of its kind, the BBC has announced that it has made a deal with YouTube to distribute its content on three YouTube channels. You can find the full announcement on the BBC website.

    Unfortunately, this doesnt mean that they’ll be scrapping the TV license anytime soon, as it happens its only snippets rather than full programmes in fact, if anything, it really isnt aimed at a UK audience, as evidenced by the fact that one of the 3 channels will not even be available to UK residents!

    The original article terms the as “groundbreaking and controversial” – while I don’t know that it really goes that far, one thing is clear. When an organisation like the BBC decides to employ online and social networking methods to promote their broadcast content, then it is certainly significant and the likelihood is that others will follow. Its also shows a level of appreciation of the benefits of these different distribution media and, perhaps, a step towards greater mutual cooperation where appropriate in the future.

    This also comes hot on the heels of statements released earlier this year that YouTube was intending to share revenues with content providers. It seems that they haven’t wasted much time in putting that into practice in a large way – so let’s see if some of the other major players and smaller contributors follow suit.

    If you enjoyed this post, make sure you subscribe to my RSS feed!

    Comments Off 
    Tags: , , ,

    Recomended Reading:

    1. Use the 2nd biggest Search engine – that’s YouTube by the way
    2. Business blog content (and business) via collaboration